In the latency tests, Ivacy performed noticeably poorly and increased latency by 2,360 percent. This is the second-worst score I have recorded, after AnchorFree Hotspot Shield's abysmal 3,145.4 percent increase. TorGuard VPN had the best score in these tests, actually reducing latency by 6.7 percent. Ivacy performed much better in the international tests, where it increased latency by 292.5 percent. That's nipping at the heels of TunnelBear, which increased latency by 270.31 percent.
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Flash your wifi router with a VPN-compatible firmware and configure the VPN on it. This is the most technically advanced option, so make sure you know what you’re doing. The process varies from router to router, and not all wifi routers are compatible with DD-WRT or Tomato firmware. If you’re not comfortable with replacing the firmware on your home wifi router, you can opt to purchase a preconfigured VPN router from ExpressVPN.
Windscribe VPN is a Canadian VPN provider that has made a dent in the low-end VPN market. They claim not to keep any logs of activity, and their software is quite good. Windscribe is also one of the last remaining VPNs that works reliably with Netflix without generating the dreaded 'proxy error'. (Hint: NordVPN is another that works flawlessly with Netflix). 
In order for a VPN to to pass our test, it must be able to unblock Netflix videos out of the box, meaning no manual configuration outside of the VPN app is necessary. It must also bypass Netflix’s firewall with a reasonable degree of consistency—no reconnecting to the same server over and over in the hopes of finding an IP address that hasn’t been blocked. Finally, we used the paid subscription versions of VPNs when available.
The VPN services listed should allow you to unblock US Netflix in any country you might be traveling to, other than those where media is censored and VPNs are actively blocked by a firewall such as China (see our list of the VPNs working in China and pick one that works there, too). In pretty much every other country, the VPNs in our list will work. In fact, we’ve received comments or emails from people in Canada, the UK, Germany, Australia, New Zealand, Switzerland, Finland, Norway, Sweden, the Netherlands, Denmark, Belgium, France, Israel, Spain, Ireland, South Africa, and Italy telling us they’ve successfully accessed US Netflix!
The VPNs we recommend can all bypass Netflix’s ban using at least one server or location. It’s not that these VPNs never get blocked; it’s just that they are prepared with both the resources and manpower to quickly replace blacklisted servers and IPs with ones that haven’t been blocked yet. This requires more time, expertise, and money than most VPN providers can reliably offer, but those that we recommend make a concerted effort to keep Netflix-unblocking servers up and running at all times.

In its policy, Ivacy says that it does not "log or monitor, online browsing activities, connection logs, VPN IPs assigned, original IP addresses, browsing history, outgoing traffic, connection times, data you have accessed and/or DNS queries generated by your end. We have no information that could associate specific activities to specific users." That's exactly what you want to hear from a VPN company.
Netflix’s VPN ban is a blunt instrument put in place to appease copyright holders. It blocks VPN users no matter where they are located so long as a proxy is detected. This is not a fair policy to paying subscribers. Forcing users to turn off their VPNs could sacrifice privacy, especially those connected on unsecured public wi-fi networks or traveling abroad to surveillance-heavy countries.

The practical upshot is that no one can intercept your web traffic as it moves from your computer to the VPN server. And if you're connecting to websites via HTTPS (which you should), your data remains encrypted for its entire journey, even after it leaves the VPN server. This is why you need a VPN. VPNs are particularly important when you're using public Wi-Fi or unfamiliar networks. In these situations, hackers may be lurking on the network or even running the network themselves, hoping to snag your personal information.
When you look at VPN services for regular users, you don’t often see purpose-based server recommendations, such as “use this server for streaming and this one for downloading.” Ivacy VPN, a 10-year-old service officially based in Singapore, stands out by doing just that. (It’s not the only service to take this tack—CyberGhost has a similar purpose-based approach—but it’s still rare.)
Ivacy also has some very strategically positioned servers. While most VPN companies ignore the entire continent of Africa, Ivacy has six locations. South and Central America is another region passed over by many VPN companies, but not Ivacy. It also provides servers in regions with repressive internet censorship, including China, Russia, and Turkey.
When it comes to the sheer number of servers to choose from, it’s tough to beat IPVanish. One of the most popular VPNs worldwide, IPVanish takes privacy very seriously and has been built with torrenting in mind. It creates no logs, not even the connection logs used for troubleshooting like ExpressVPN. L2TP and OpenVPN protocols both use 256-bit encryption. IPVanish uses shared IP addresses, and even has a built-in feature that lets users switch IPs periodically, such as every 60 minutes.
Using a VPN goes a long way to improving your personal security, but it's not a bulletproof, magical solution. When it comes to security, we often say that it's better to think of tools like VPNs as raising the effort required to successfully attack you. If someone is willing to invest the time and money in targeting you specifically, they will eventually get what they're after. A VPN needs to be part of a layered approach to security and can't take the place of critical tools, such as good antivirus software.

Windscribe VPN is a Canadian VPN provider that has made a dent in the low-end VPN market. They claim not to keep any logs of activity, and their software is quite good. Windscribe is also one of the last remaining VPNs that works reliably with Netflix without generating the dreaded 'proxy error'. (Hint: NordVPN is another that works flawlessly with Netflix). 

For the Mac, Ivacy offers just one app. You won't, however, find it in the official Mac App Store. You have to download it from the Ivacy website instead. We haven't had the chance to bring this app into the labs for testing just yet, but I will update this review once we do. The competition between macOS VPN apps is heating up, as nearly every single VPN company now supports the fruit-flavored computer maker.
Ivacy's streak of mediocrity continued into the upload tests, where it had the third-worst score recorded. Here, it reduced upload speed test results by 31.9 percent. To be fair, the worst score is far worse than that (KeepSolid VPN Unlimited, 71.3 percent), but it's also a long way from the best score. That goes to IPVanish, which slowed upload speed test results by only 2.9 percent. Again, Ivacy's international tests were a mirror of its domestic performance. Here, Ivacy had one of the better scores, reducing upload speed test results by 97.81 percent. It wasn't however, enough to unseat Private Internet Access, which reduced upload speed test results by 97.3 percent.
When it comes to the sheer number of servers to choose from, it’s tough to beat IPVanish. One of the most popular VPNs worldwide, IPVanish takes privacy very seriously and has been built with torrenting in mind. It creates no logs, not even the connection logs used for troubleshooting like ExpressVPN. L2TP and OpenVPN protocols both use 256-bit encryption. IPVanish uses shared IP addresses, and even has a built-in feature that lets users switch IPs periodically, such as every 60 minutes.

Security Kiss comes with several plans and the free one gives access to 4 locations. It supports OpenVPN on Windows and Mac, which is the preferred protocol. With a daily limit of 300 MB, there is not much torrenting you can do, but if you plan to download a few songs or lightweight apk files, it can be useful. Click here to learn what real users think of Security Kiss.
I subscribed to their services on June 2016 for one year @ $1.83 PM. For six months everything worked well, so I extended their service for 2 more years. Then the problems started, the nearest servers would fail and I had to always rely on distant servers with a very high ping and low speeds. Their P2P services have become terrible ! Their customer service is pathetic ! They tell you to do this and that and probably never understand what our problem is.

In its policy, Ivacy says that it does not "log or monitor, online browsing activities, connection logs, VPN IPs assigned, original IP addresses, browsing history, outgoing traffic, connection times, data you have accessed and/or DNS queries generated by your end. We have no information that could associate specific activities to specific users." That's exactly what you want to hear from a VPN company.
These attacks are the culprits in some of the most common you hear about every single day on the news. For example, brute force attacks are one of the leading ways people gain access to WordPress websites (which is the single biggest platform on the internet). They’re also the method that’s commonly used to hack into celebrity iCloud accounts and leak… well, private, photos and videos.
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