The main reason to use a VPN is to protect your data from being spied upon by ISPs, hackers, and three-letter government agencies. So it wouldn't make sense to use a service that would spy on you, too. In order to evaluate what efforts VPN companies take to protect your privacy, I read through their entire privacy policy and discuss issues with company representatives.
Journalists and activists operating in regimes that censor the internet have used VPNs for years to securely tunnel past those web controls and access the open internet. By the same token, you can connect to a distant VPN server and make it appear as if your traffic is coming from a different country. That's handy, especially if you want to stream video from a different country.
Secondly, a VPN prevents other users downloading and/or uploading the same files as you from seeing your IP address. BitTorrent is a P2P, or peer-to-peer, protocol. That means everyone who uses the same torrent file is connected in what’s known as a “swarm”. Each device connected to the swarm can see all of the other IP addresses of all the other devices in the swarm. Many BitTorrent clients even allow you to view a list of other devices you’re connected to when leeching or seeding files on the network.
When you download or seed a torrent, you’re connecting to a bunch of other people, called a swarm. All of those people can see your computer’s IP address—they have to in order to connect. That’s all very handy when you’re sharing files with other netizens, but file sharers such as yourself aren’t necessarily the only people paying attention. Piracy monitoring groups (often paid for by the entertainment industry either before or after they find violators) also join BitTorrent swarms, but instead of sharing files, they’re logging the IP addresses of other people in the swarm—including you—so that they can notify your ISP of your doings.
When you look at VPN services for regular users, you don’t often see purpose-based server recommendations, such as “use this server for streaming and this one for downloading.” Ivacy VPN, a 10-year-old service officially based in Singapore, stands out by doing just that. (It’s not the only service to take this tack—CyberGhost has a similar purpose-based approach—but it’s still rare.)
When it comes to the sheer number of servers to choose from, it’s tough to beat IPVanish. One of the most popular VPNs worldwide, IPVanish takes privacy very seriously and has been built with torrenting in mind. It creates no logs, not even the connection logs used for troubleshooting like ExpressVPN. L2TP and OpenVPN protocols both use 256-bit encryption. IPVanish uses shared IP addresses, and even has a built-in feature that lets users switch IPs periodically, such as every 60 minutes.
With Netflix, the problem is that they are improving on detecting VPNs and blocking them. But there is this gap, that if your VPN provider regularly creates new servers, that are unknown to Netflix, you will have a possibility to access the geo-blocked content. I found NordVPN to be the best fit because I can pick the newest servers myself and they are always creating new ones. I did talk with NordVPNs customer support about the fuzz going around Netflix blocking VPNs. They assured me that new servers are the key to bypass the restrictions. Also, this feature is handy when one server is full of users, and the speed gets a bit slow. From my personal experience, I can say, that Netflix US/AU worked great and I could watch all the shows, that were primarily blocked because of my location.
To ensure that it’s working, head over to Torguard’s IP Checker. This site can tell you what your IP address is, and compare it to the IP address of your torrent client, which will let you know whether your proxy is working correctly. To test it, hit the “Generate Torrent” button, and open the resulting torrent in uTorrent. Then, go back to your browser and hit the Refresh button under the “Check IP” tab. If it’s the same as your browser IP—which you’ll see next to the Refresh button—then your proxy isn’t working, and you’ll want to double-check all of the above settings. If it shows a different IP address (which should be in the Netherlands), then Private Internet Access is successfully tunneling all your traffic for you.

NordVPN uses shared IP addresses, and bandwidth is unlimited. Torrenting is explicitly permitted. A proxy, encrypted chat, and self-destructing encrypted notes are extra features included in each subscription. It can also unblock a range of geo-locked streaming services including Netflix US, Hulu, BBC iPlayer, and Amazon Prime Video. A 30 day money-back guarantee means you can try the service and receive a full refund if not entirely happy.
We all know that Ivacy VPN offers a whole host of benefits, the most prominent of which is the fact that it allows you to access, quite literally, a whole world of entertainment. Streaming entertainment is always something that has been considered very costly and even when you do pay good money, you're limited to a small variety of programs. When you use Ivacy VPN in conjunction with IPTV, both of these conundrums come to a rapid end.
When you look at VPN services for regular users, you don’t often see purpose-based server recommendations, such as “use this server for streaming and this one for downloading.” Ivacy VPN, a 10-year-old service officially based in Singapore, stands out by doing just that. (It’s not the only service to take this tack—CyberGhost has a similar purpose-based approach—but it’s still rare.)
Hotspot Shield is really popular – especially the free version. One of the main reasons for that is its super fast speeds, which are ideal for downloading. That said, the free version limits the amount of data you can use to 500 MB a day, which may not be enough depending on how big your torrent files are. But since it’s free, it’s worth giving a shot.
Understanding what kind of information a VPN service collects, and how long it is maintained, can be hard to figure out. To get the answer, you may have to wade through unending FAQ pages and opaque terms of service written in arcane legalese. If the VPN company you're considering can't clearly explain what information it gathers and how long it will be kept, it's probably not a great service.
You have a few different options when it comes to hiding your BitTorrent activity, but we’ve found that a proxy is the most convenient and easiest to set up, so that’s what we’re going to cover here. We’ve talked about proxies a few times before, most notably with our original guide on how to set up BTGuard our guide to safe torrenting post-Demonoid. Unfortunately, BTGuard has never been a great service—it was just the most convenient. Thankfully, Private Internet Access—one of our favorite VPN providers—now provides a proxy very similar to BTGuard, but with faster speeds and better customer service. So we recommend using it instead, using the instructions below. If you don’t want to use a proxy, check out the end of the article for a few alternative suggestions.
Canada is widely acclaimed for a massive number of internet users than any other country. Being a mainstream region for tech geeks, Canadians love to stream videos online. However, popular Canadian channels are geo-restricted outside Canada, meaning that users can’t access Bravo, CBC, Sportsnet and Canal De from outside Canada. To get away with restrictions, Canada VPN provides instant access to all Canadian channels from anywhere in the world. However, I haven’t tried BTGuard yet but I would suggest users to get a decent Canada VPN like Express VPN and Ivacy for top-notch privacy, anonymity and accessibility.

The Dedicated IP option requires an add-on purchase (discussed below). The Unblocking option defaults to a nearby country that doesn't have restricted content. If you're looking to access websites blocked by your local government, this is the option for you. I'm not clear on Secure Download options, however. When I selected it, Ivacy connected me to a VPN server in Belgium. To my mind, the Belgians are known for their excellent beer and not so much their prestige in downloading.

Fussiness aside, Ivacy echoes the scenario-based setup of PureVPN and Hide My Ass. The right rail has presets for Secure Download, Streaming, Unblocking, and Dedicated IP. You can pick the one that meets your needs in the moment, or use the Fast Connect button from the main page. Most scenario-centered VPN services, including PureVPN, eschew the Fast Connect option, to their detriment.
When you download or seed a torrent, you’re connecting to a bunch of other people, called a swarm. All of those people can see your computer’s IP address—they have to in order to connect. That’s all very handy when you’re sharing files with other netizens, but file sharers such as yourself aren’t necessarily the only people paying attention. Piracy monitoring groups (often paid for by the entertainment industry either before or after they find violators) also join BitTorrent swarms, but instead of sharing files, they’re logging the IP addresses of other people in the swarm—including you—so that they can notify your ISP of your doings.
Those aren't the only threats to your data. Congress, in its infinite wisdom, has decided to let ISPs sell anonymized user data. A VPN prevents your ISP from snooping on your online activity in an attempt to monetize you. Because your traffic, and the traffic of others, appears to come from the VPN server, it's much harder (but not impossible) to correlate online activities to your computer. That's great if you're concerned about advertisers or law enforcement trying to track your activities online.
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