The number of servers, however, can be a bit deceiving. Some VPN companies make extensive use of virtual server locations. These are physical servers configured to behave as if they are actually several servers in different locations. This is an issue for anyone concerned about the precise path of their data. You might be miffed to discover that by selecting a server in the data haven of Iceland, that it was actually being routed through a virtual server in Shanghai.
Ivacy's mode for distribution on iPhone is similar to its Android strategy. Again, it offers a free version called Ivacy Lite and the main app called simply Ivacy VPN. We haven't had the chance to test either version, but we look forward to seeing how it compares with other iPhone VPN apps. I'll update this review once we get one of these apps into the lab.

Unfortunately, I found that Ivacy didn't always work as advertised. Part of my testing involves connecting to a VPN server in Australia. For whatever reason, Ivacy couldn't successfully connect with any of the Australian VPN servers I selected. That's disappointing. I had a similar problem when testing the Firefox and Chrome browser extensions, except those wouldn't connect to any servers. Ivacy needs to clean up its act in this regard.


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But, despite the thousands of hours of content available to Netflix users in each country, they still want more and you know what the best part about it is? That they can get! Actually, Netflix is a geo-restricted site which means that while most of its shows can be watched worldwide irrespective of which country you are located in, it does offer a significant number of shows in some countries while blacking the rest out from viewing them.
Those aren't the only threats to your data. Congress, in its infinite wisdom, has decided to let ISPs sell anonymized user data. A VPN prevents your ISP from snooping on your online activity in an attempt to monetize you. Because your traffic, and the traffic of others, appears to come from the VPN server, it's much harder (but not impossible) to correlate online activities to your computer. That's great if you're concerned about advertisers or law enforcement trying to track your activities online.
Thanks for your comment. As far as comparing AirVPN with PureVPN goes, there’s a lot of difference between the two. PureVPN has servers in over 140 countries whereas AirVPN has only a handful of servers. If we compare the prices, then PureVPN also has an edge over AirVPN. On the contrary, AirVPN and PureVPN offer similar security measures: OpenVPN protocol and AES 256 bit encryption.
A VPN that unblocks Netflix in a web browser might not unblock the Netflix app on your mobile device, set-top box, or smart TV. That’s because a web browser must use the DNS servers specified by the operating system. Most VPN apps take care of this for you and route all DNS requests to their own in-house DNS servers, which ensures that DNS requests match the location of your VPN server.
A quick note about VPN testing: networks are finnicky things, and we don't claim our work to be the be-all and end-all of VPN speed testing. Instead, this is a snapshot of how a particular service performed on a specific day. We also don't think that speeds should be the only metric used to evaluate a VPN, but it's clearly of concern to BitTorrent users.

The Netflix app, however, can override a device’s DNS settings and force DNS requests to be sent to either a public DNS nameserver or the default ISP’s nameserver. This results in a mismatch between where the user’s IP address is located and where their DNS requests come from. That’s a red flag indicating the viewer is using a VPN or some other type of proxy, resulting in the dreaded Netflix proxy error message.
When you look at VPN services for regular users, you don’t often see purpose-based server recommendations, such as “use this server for streaming and this one for downloading.” Ivacy VPN, a 10-year-old service officially based in Singapore, stands out by doing just that. (It’s not the only service to take this tack—CyberGhost has a similar purpose-based approach—but it’s still rare.)
Chrome Extension has been promised like a year ago, my subscription is about to expire and no extensions to date. Pure promises, not mention slow Torrent download and disconnection. They bragged that they are working on their Chrome Extension, how funny was that working on a single feature for more than a year??? I guess you only have one developer for God Sake.
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