HideMyAss recently added servers specifically for users who want to unblock US and UK Netflix. We have tested it and confirmed it works on both desktop browser and Netflix’s mobile app on Android and iOS. We recommend you contact HMA’s customer support to ask which server to use and troubleshoot any issues you might have connecting, as you might need to change some other settings on your device as well. The US server also unblocks Hulu.
Let's firstly examine the sheer volume of servers that Ivacy VPN has over a series of different locations in the world. Let us explain. Remember how we were talking about geo restrictions? These can be bypassed if you connect to one of the desired county's servers. By this logic, the more servers there are in several locations, the wider your access to global entertainment.
Apart from being able to unblock Netflix and its massive library of movies, TV shows, documentaries and more; you will benefit from a drastic increase in bandwidth speeds. A lot of people are not aware of the fact that ISPs throttling is an issue. Due to ISP throttling, you are prevented from getting a seamless experience, but that will not be the case if you stay connected to Ivacy’s highly optimized servers.
This approach worked for a few months until it caught the attention of Netflix, and a subsequent crackdown blocked most smart DNS proxy users. Today, a handful of smart DNS proxy services can still unblock Netflix, but the only one that’s consistently worked for us is ExpressVPN’s MediaStreamer service. MediaStreamer is a smart DNS proxy service that comes with every ExpressVPN subscription. It’s used by default when you connect to the VPN, or you can set it up separately so that it’s used on its own.
Many VPN companies now offer browser extensions in addition to native apps. These are much more lightweight than their desktop companions and have the added advantage of being available anywhere you log in to a browser. The downside, as I discovered when working with Chromebook VPNs, is that VPN browser extensions only encrypt your browser traffic. The rest of your computer's data travels outside the encrypted tunnel.
VPNGate is a fantastic academic initiative out of Japan that aims to uncensor the web for people living under oppressive anti-free speech regimes. It uses a network of volunteer nodes around the world as relays. It discourages P2P filesharing activities that would hog the network, however, and it keeps logs for up to three months to help weed out abuse and criminal wrongdoing.
Those aren't the only threats to your data. Congress, in its infinite wisdom, has decided to let ISPs sell anonymized user data. A VPN prevents your ISP from snooping on your online activity in an attempt to monetize you. Because your traffic, and the traffic of others, appears to come from the VPN server, it's much harder (but not impossible) to correlate online activities to your computer. That's great if you're concerned about advertisers or law enforcement trying to track your activities online.
Users who want access to the Belgian version of Netflix have the smallest choice of VPN providers; it can only be unblocked by one of the 59 VPNs we tested (ProtonVPN). Unblocking Netflix in countries like Belgium and Turkey is probably not at the top of the priority list for most VPNs, and many of the VPNs we tested don’t have servers in those countries at all.
The Copyright Modernization Act passed in January 2014 requires ISPs send notices to copyright violators on their networks. The recipients’ identities are stored on ISP servers for six months. Copyright holders cannot sue for damages of more than $5,000 when the copy is used for non-commercial purposes, which in most cases simply isn’t worth the time or effort.

These VPNs work with Netflix, but for one reason or another, they don’t make the top seven cutoff. This may be due to inconsistent service, privacy concerns, speed, or inability to unblock Netflix on mobile devices. Netflix frequently blocks VPNs, so we also favor those with a proven track record of bypassing the proxy error. Erring on the side of caution, we don’t want to recommend VPNs that work today but not tomorrow.


One of the major reasons why people recommend VPN over proxies is that torrent clients reveal your true location and leak information while using proxy. Although, the latest version of torrent clients are designed to do a better job at this but I personally don’t trust proxy services. They can be unreliable and fail to protect you while using torrents. I would rather stick with a VPN just because of this. Currently, I am using PIA (Private Internet Access) but I have also heard good reviews about PureVPN.

In late 2018, Parliament passed an amendment to the Copyright Act. This amendment lets ISPs censor proxy and mirror sites—duplicates of torrent trackers put up after the original site is blocked—without needing to return to court for each injunction. Likewise, Google and other search engines must demote or remove links to infringing sites including their proxies and mirrors.


PrivateVPN unblocks Netflix in more countries than any other provider—no small feat for a young VPN with only a hundred or so servers. The servers that work best for streaming are clearly labelled in the app, which is simple and novice-friendly. PrivateVPN scored well in our speed tests, meaning you can continue to stream your favorite Netflix shows in high definition.
These VPNs work with Netflix, but for one reason or another, they don’t make the top seven cutoff. This may be due to inconsistent service, privacy concerns, speed, or inability to unblock Netflix on mobile devices. Netflix frequently blocks VPNs, so we also favor those with a proven track record of bypassing the proxy error. Erring on the side of caution, we don’t want to recommend VPNs that work today but not tomorrow.
Some unscrupulous free VPN providers could well be scraping users’ personal data and selling it to third parties. One such high-profile case was Hola, a free VPN provider based in Israel. Hola was caught selling users’ bandwidth, and it was criticized for being opaque about how each Hola user became a node on the network rather than hosting its own dedicated VPN servers.
We often receive emails asking about the interplay between VPNs and BitTorrent. Some of them have included admissions of piracy, and even justifications for it. One reader bemoaned the difficulty in finding legal avenues for material that is out of print or just hard to obtain or not available for sale in a given locale. We sympathize. The state of the public domain has been woefully neglected, and market forces and regional distribution deals often keep worthy art and materials out of the hands of those who want it, even if they are willing to pay for it. But no matter how just the reasoning, the law (however problematic) is the law. ISPs and, yes, other web companies, are often compelled to answer when rights holders come with a list of offenses carried out on their data infrastructure.
CyberGhost adheres to a no-logs policy, uses 256-bit AES encryption with perfect forward secrecy, and has a kill switch on its desktop clients. An app-specific kill switch is buried in the settings, dubbed “app protection,” which will only cut off internet to specified programs, e.g. a torrent client. CyberGhost Pro scored well in our speed tests and can even unblock US Netflix and Amazon Prime Video.
All connections are securely encrypted, and you can even opt to obfuscate traffic using a special “Scramble” feature that disguises OpenVPN connections. DNS leak protection and a kill switch are built into the apps. StrongVPN has long been a favorite among users in China, and its recent upgrades make it appeal to a wider audience including torrenters.

Panama-based NordVPN keeps neither connection nor traffic logs. 256-bit AES encryption with perfect forward secrecy is the default, along with optional double-hop encryption and Tor over VPN features. Speeds are great, but can be a bit volatile. DNS leak protection and a kill switch can both be toggled on in the settings. The traditional all-or-nothing kill switch is one option, or you can specify which programs get cut off from the internet if the VPN connection drops, such as a BitTorrent client.


These attacks are the culprits in some of the most common you hear about every single day on the news. For example, brute force attacks are one of the leading ways people gain access to WordPress websites (which is the single biggest platform on the internet). They’re also the method that’s commonly used to hack into celebrity iCloud accounts and leak… well, private, photos and videos.
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