Hide.me is a fast VPN that has apps for all major platforms including iPhone and Android. In the free version, you can only connect to three servers and get 2GB per month. Hide.me also does not have OpenVPN support, which might be a disappointment for security-conscious users. Hide.me does, however, support PPTP, L2TP, SSTP, and IPSec. While you only get 3 servers to choose from, you can download torrents without any restrictions (except for the data limit). Find out what real Hide.me users have to say here.
Ivacy has a bare-bones offering out of the box. You can spice things up with a NAT firewall for an additional $1 per month. That's a bit odd, since many other companies include this feature for free. Ivacy also has dedicated IP addresses for $1.99 per month in Australia, Canada, Germany, Hong Kong, Singapore, as well as the UK and the US. A dedicated IP is less likely to be blocked, since it won't be immediately recognized as part of a VPN's IP block.
Ivacy VPN for Windows has been specifically crafted for the OS and its environment. Secure your Windows-powered devices by becoming anonymous. Unblock and access any and all sites no matter your location. Download torrents, share information and content securely. Customer support available 24/7 and Risk-free investment with a 30-day money back guarantee. Join 50K+ users who benefit from the best Windows VPN, Ivacy.

One of the major reasons why people recommend VPN over proxies is that torrent clients reveal your true location and leak information while using proxy. Although, the latest version of torrent clients are designed to do a better job at this but I personally don’t trust proxy services. They can be unreliable and fail to protect you while using torrents. I would rather stick with a VPN just because of this. Currently, I am using PIA (Private Internet Access) but I have also heard good reviews about PureVPN.
The short answer is that, yes, a VPN can shield your online activities from your ISP. And that's a good thing, not only if you have legally iffy torrenting habits, but also because it protects your privacy in general. An online survey of 1,000 conducted by PCMag found that 25 percent of respondents named ISPs as the biggest threat to their online privacy. That's entirely correct.
This testing works well for comparisons, but it is far from a comprehensive assessment of a VPN's overall performance. So many factors can affect network performance, from the time of day to the individual configuration of VPN servers that I cannot account for all of them. Therefore, it's useful to think of these results as a snapshot of performance.
Buffered CEO Jordan Fried suspects Netflix could put the final nail in the VPN coffin if it truly wished to do so. Instead, it has resisted avoiding losing more customers. The argument against a billing address-based filtering scheme, Netflix might argue, is that the copyright licensing restrictions apply to where content is being watched from, not where the subscriber’s money comes from.

We often receive emails asking about the interplay between VPNs and BitTorrent. Some of them have included admissions of piracy, and even justifications for it. One reader bemoaned the difficulty in finding legal avenues for material that is out of print or just hard to obtain or not available for sale in a given locale. We sympathize. The state of the public domain has been woefully neglected, and market forces and regional distribution deals often keep worthy art and materials out of the hands of those who want it, even if they are willing to pay for it. But no matter how just the reasoning, the law (however problematic) is the law. ISPs and, yes, other web companies, are often compelled to answer when rights holders come with a list of offenses carried out on their data infrastructure.

A VPN masks your IP address so that other devices in the swarm only see the IP address of the P2P VPN server. The best VPNs for torrenting typically use shared IP addresses, meaning dozens and even hundreds of users are assigned the same IP address. This large pool of users makes it next to impossible to trace torrenting activity back to a single person. Furthermore, if you use one of the logless VPNs on this list, the VPN provider won’t have any user information to hand over when hit with a DMCA notice or settlement letter.


Your account credentials are only to manage your account—we’ll need a new set of credentials for the Proxy service. In the client control panel, click the “Generate Password” button under “PPTP/L2TP/SOCKS Password.” This is what we’ll be using to configure our BitTorrent client. Write down the username and password that appears here (it’s different than your regular account credentials) and move on to step two.
PC app is really unstable, connection disconnects a lot, it will use the Ikev network adapter even when you set it to udp, it’s meant to use the openvpn adapter when you set it to udp or tcp, so I have to manually delete the ikev adapter for it to recognise and use the openvpn adapter, also the killswitch will shut off the internet completely which is good but even the Ivacy app will not be able to use the internet to login to your account!!! So have to disable the killswitch, and to prevent ip/dns leak you’ve got to restart the app in admin mode which will the disable the killswitch while the app restarts, also the windows app sometimes factory resets itself and all the settings you’ve set are gone and you have to login again. The iOS app is even more of a privacy hazard as the killswitch uses the “connect on demand” switch, what occurs though is that when you switch networks to say a new Wi-fi network or you turn off Wi-fi and use cellular, the “connect on demand” switch will sometimes disable itself and you are unawarely browsing the web with no VPN connection. Also they offer a free trial but with the NordVPN scandal of hacker/scammers abusing free vpn trials, I hope Ivacy gets rid of it to deter them, and offers a money back guarantee instead.
When you look at VPN services for regular users, you don’t often see purpose-based server recommendations, such as “use this server for streaming and this one for downloading.” Ivacy VPN, a 10-year-old service officially based in Singapore, stands out by doing just that. (It’s not the only service to take this tack—CyberGhost has a similar purpose-based approach—but it’s still rare.)
Our custom-built VPN for Netflix gives you the ability to Unblock Netflix from any region. If you want to access the entire library, there is no better place to start than by accessing Netflix US. Whether you are traveling or reside abroad, you will be able to access American Netflix in a few simple steps. So if you want to enjoy the latest TV shows and movies in Ultra HD, that too without compromising your account, then Ivacy’s Netflix VPN is the way to go.
When using a Netflix native app, however, the app can override the DNS routing used by a VPN and send requests to your nearest public DNS server. This means Netflix can determine the user’s true location and block them accordingly, even with a VPN app switched on. ExpressVPN and NordVPN have figured out how to overcome this behavior, so they both work with the iOS and Android Netflix apps so this won’t be a problem for if you are using one of these two VPNs.
This is another VPN that features a built-in killswitch, so even if leaks were detected, your torrenting security would still be protected. The problem with leaks is that they often go undetected. So an oblivious user would carry on, thinking that they were safe and secure, all the while their ISP is watching every move they make. A killswitch counteracts this vulnerability.
It seems like every two or three weeks I log into the VPN, I connect with no problem but cannot connect to any server. The resolution the first few times was to update the software. It has recently devolved into updating the software AND changing the protocol. If that were consistent I could live with it but I have to contact support and find out the latest combination steps to take to fix the problem. Each instance sucks 24 hours out of my life.
×