I asked Ivacy if anyone from the company’s senior management was public about their identity, and the response was “no.” Senior management would rather keep identity a secret as other players have done,” a company spokesperson said. “VPN providers are engaged in critical criminal cases which could harm their personal safety and security. Therefore it has been rather advised...to keep a lower profile for the sake of everyone’s security and continued business operations.”
Watch your Plex library in Kodi with the Plex Kodi addonDecember 24, 2017 / by AaronHow to set up Plex on Chromecast and get the most out of itDecember 7, 2017 / by AaronPlex vs Kodi: Which streaming software is right for you?November 1, 2017 / by AaronInstalling and using the Fire TV Plex appOctober 31, 2017 / by AaronThe best Plex plugins: 25 of our favorites (Updated)September 20, 2017 / by Aaron
Romania-based CyberGhost allows P2P filesharing on any server that isn’t located in the US or Russia. Due to legal pressure, CyberGhost actively blocks BitTorrent traffic in those two countries (presumably by blocking popular ports used by BitTorrent clients, but we haven’t tested this). CyberGhost isn’t wholly adverse to torrenting, though, and even has a “Torrent Anonymously” profile that will connect you to the best torrenting VPN server available.
In order for a VPN to to pass our test, it must be able to unblock Netflix videos out of the box, meaning no manual configuration outside of the VPN app is necessary. It must also bypass Netflix’s firewall with a reasonable degree of consistency—no reconnecting to the same server over and over in the hopes of finding an IP address that hasn’t been blocked. Finally, we used the paid subscription versions of VPNs when available.

We often receive emails asking about the interplay between VPNs and BitTorrent. Some of them have included admissions of piracy, and even justifications for it. One reader bemoaned the difficulty in finding legal avenues for material that is out of print or just hard to obtain or not available for sale in a given locale. We sympathize. The state of the public domain has been woefully neglected, and market forces and regional distribution deals often keep worthy art and materials out of the hands of those who want it, even if they are willing to pay for it. But no matter how just the reasoning, the law (however problematic) is the law. ISPs and, yes, other web companies, are often compelled to answer when rights holders come with a list of offenses carried out on their data infrastructure.

Certain Kodi add-ons also source video streams from torrents. Keep an eye out in particular for a newer platform called Acestreams. Acestreams use peer-to-peer bittorrent connections so concurrent users can share the load of a stream. That means your connection is shared with others, causing potential security and privacy issues that can usually be averted with a torrent VPN. Acestreams are increasingly popular for both live and on-demand content.
We all know that Ivacy VPN offers a whole host of benefits, the most prominent of which is the fact that it allows you to access, quite literally, a whole world of entertainment. Streaming entertainment is always something that has been considered very costly and even when you do pay good money, you're limited to a small variety of programs. When you use Ivacy VPN in conjunction with IPTV, both of these conundrums come to a rapid end.

Let's firstly examine the sheer volume of servers that Ivacy VPN has over a series of different locations in the world. Let us explain. Remember how we were talking about geo restrictions? These can be bypassed if you connect to one of the desired county's servers. By this logic, the more servers there are in several locations, the wider your access to global entertainment.


The short answer is a big yes. Internet Service Providers can effortlessly crack open one of these pipes and log or monitor all your Internet traffic data, including all your browsing history and sometimes even the content of your emails. Depending on where you reside and who your Internet provider is, they may actually be mandated to log your internet data and forward it on to law enforcement, copyright extortionists, and advertisers.

Ivacy's mode for distribution on iPhone is similar to its Android strategy. Again, it offers a free version called Ivacy Lite and the main app called simply Ivacy VPN. We haven't had the chance to test either version, but we look forward to seeing how it compares with other iPhone VPN apps. I'll update this review once we get one of these apps into the lab.
Another great benefit is the fact that most VPN services operate a network of servers located across the globe. In other words, the user can select a server located in a specific country, and have a new IP address from that country. With a VPN, anyone monitoring your traffic only sees the IP address of the VPN server. Your location, IP address, downloads, and Internet activity are masked behind the VPN.

The practical upshot is that no one can intercept your web traffic as it moves from your computer to the VPN server. And if you're connecting to websites via HTTPS (which you should), your data remains encrypted for its entire journey, even after it leaves the VPN server. This is why you need a VPN. VPNs are particularly important when you're using public Wi-Fi or unfamiliar networks. In these situations, hackers may be lurking on the network or even running the network themselves, hoping to snag your personal information.
Morgan says Netflix probably isn’t targeting isolated VPN providers. He believes a combination of techniques is used to block them. One of those techniques, says LiquidVPN CEO Dave Cox, is by identifying connections coming from data centers instead of residences. He goes on to explain that the Netflix apps combat SmartDNS services by forcing you to use a public DNS server and frequently change the URLs that do geolocation for their content. This makes it impossible for services that could support thousands of customers streaming at a time by only forwarding the geolocation packets through their servers.

Torrent is like a bucket full of gold. I remember the time when I downloaded Transformers, Wolf of Wall Street and Ironman from the torrent, until I received this copyright infringement notice. I searched the internet to continue using the torrents as I can’t afford spending hundreds of dollar on movies. So, I came up with VPN, VPN has enabled me to download unlimited movies on monthly basis. Thanks for sharing such a good post!
In late 2018, Parliament passed an amendment to the Copyright Act. This amendment lets ISPs censor proxy and mirror sites—duplicates of torrent trackers put up after the original site is blocked—without needing to return to court for each injunction. Likewise, Google and other search engines must demote or remove links to infringing sites including their proxies and mirrors.
Ivacy also has some very strategically positioned servers. While most VPN companies ignore the entire continent of Africa, Ivacy has six locations. South and Central America is another region passed over by many VPN companies, but not Ivacy. It also provides servers in regions with repressive internet censorship, including China, Russia, and Turkey.
Using a free VPN for anonymous torrenting is generally a no-no. Due to the large amount of bandwidth required, many free VPN services prohibit P2P activity. Others aren’t secure, and many have data caps. The common adage that comes with free services is that if you don’t buy the product, then you are the product. This is especially true because a VPN isn’t just a piece of software, it’s an ongoing service that requires continuous resources and maintenance.
Ivacy's privacy is longer and less clear than I like, but entirely readable. It might sound a bit odd, but I actually have preferences when it comes to privacy policies. TunnelBear's, for example, is very easy to read and includes pop-outs to explain the company's thinking and complex issues. TorGuard has, perhaps, the shortest and most glib of privacy policies.
The short answer is that, yes, a VPN can shield your online activities from your ISP. And that's a good thing, not only if you have legally iffy torrenting habits, but also because it protects your privacy in general. An online survey of 1,000 conducted by PCMag found that 25 percent of respondents named ISPs as the biggest threat to their online privacy. That's entirely correct.
Panama-based NordVPN keeps neither connection nor traffic logs. 256-bit AES encryption with perfect forward secrecy is the default, along with optional double-hop encryption and Tor over VPN features. Speeds are great, but can be a bit volatile. DNS leak protection and a kill switch can both be toggled on in the settings. The traditional all-or-nothing kill switch is one option, or you can specify which programs get cut off from the internet if the VPN connection drops, such as a BitTorrent client.
The practical upshot is that no one can intercept your web traffic as it moves from your computer to the VPN server. And if you're connecting to websites via HTTPS (which you should), your data remains encrypted for its entire journey, even after it leaves the VPN server. This is why you need a VPN. VPNs are particularly important when you're using public Wi-Fi or unfamiliar networks. In these situations, hackers may be lurking on the network or even running the network themselves, hoping to snag your personal information.
×