We often receive emails asking about the interplay between VPNs and BitTorrent. Some of them have included admissions of piracy, and even justifications for it. One reader bemoaned the difficulty in finding legal avenues for material that is out of print or just hard to obtain or not available for sale in a given locale. We sympathize. The state of the public domain has been woefully neglected, and market forces and regional distribution deals often keep worthy art and materials out of the hands of those who want it, even if they are willing to pay for it. But no matter how just the reasoning, the law (however problematic) is the law. ISPs and, yes, other web companies, are often compelled to answer when rights holders come with a list of offenses carried out on their data infrastructure.
Another great benefit is the fact that most VPN services operate a network of servers located across the globe. In other words, the user can select a server located in a specific country, and have a new IP address from that country. With a VPN, anyone monitoring your traffic only sees the IP address of the VPN server. Your location, IP address, downloads, and Internet activity are masked behind the VPN.
The VPNs we recommend can all bypass Netflix’s ban using at least one server or location. It’s not that these VPNs never get blocked; it’s just that they are prepared with both the resources and manpower to quickly replace blacklisted servers and IPs with ones that haven’t been blocked yet. This requires more time, expertise, and money than most VPN providers can reliably offer, but those that we recommend make a concerted effort to keep Netflix-unblocking servers up and running at all times.

Are there any Free VPNs that can unblock Netflix US and save us from paying for those hefty plans by paid VPNs? If you are among those who think on the same lines, you are in for a bit of a surprise. Netflix unblocking is a tough ask and only the Best VPNs for netflix are up to it reliably, but do Free VPNs count amongst them is a question that we will answer in our guide on the Best Free VPN for Netflix By BestVPN.co!


Online piracy laws are a little fuzzy in India. A slew of news reports from 2016 suggested that even viewing certain web pages or torrent files (not the copyrighted content itself) was enough to penalize netizens with heavy fines and jail time. This is not true, however; the rumor arose from a poorly-worded warning from Indian ISPs that appeared when users tried to access blocked sites.


Smart DNS proxies like Unotelly, Overplay, Unlocator, and Unblock-US were a flash in the pan during Netflix’s war on proxies. After Netflix blocked connections from most VPN servers, many users switched to these services instead. A smart DNS proxy is a server that monitors any DNS requests sent from your device. DNS requests are a means of looking up which domain names (e.g. “netflix.com”) are associated with which servers. If it detects a DNS request for Netflix, it sends all the browser traffic for that request through the server to an American Netflix server, thereby changing both your IP address and DNS server.


You’ll get slower download speeds. Running your connection through another server inevitably slows you down, though how much depends on what torrent you’re downloading, who from, and a lot of other factors. In my experience, more popular torrents stayed at their top speed of 3.4 MB/s (my bandwidth cap) with a proxy, while other less popular torrents slowed down from 1 MB/s to about 500-600 kB/s. Your mileage may vary. I lost significantly less speed with Private Internet Access than I did with BTGuard, though.
An account with Ivacy VPN costs $8.95 per month, making it one of the most affordable VPNs I've yet reviewed. The average cost of a month-to-month VPN service is currently at around $10.50, well above what Ivacy charges. Ivacy is still pricier than Private Internet Access, however, as that Editors' Choice-winning service runs a mere $6.95 per month.

Morgan says Netflix probably isn’t targeting isolated VPN providers. He believes a combination of techniques is used to block them. One of those techniques, says LiquidVPN CEO Dave Cox, is by identifying connections coming from data centers instead of residences. He goes on to explain that the Netflix apps combat SmartDNS services by forcing you to use a public DNS server and frequently change the URLs that do geolocation for their content. This makes it impossible for services that could support thousands of customers streaming at a time by only forwarding the geolocation packets through their servers.
We all know that Ivacy VPN offers a whole host of benefits, the most prominent of which is the fact that it allows you to access, quite literally, a whole world of entertainment. Streaming entertainment is always something that has been considered very costly and even when you do pay good money, you're limited to a small variety of programs. When you use Ivacy VPN in conjunction with IPTV, both of these conundrums come to a rapid end.
It's also important to know where your VPN company is located, since this dictates the legal jurisdiction under which it operates. Because of their location, some companies may be required to hold on to certain data for set periods of time, or need to cooperate with different law enforcement bodies. Ivacy is located in Singapore and operates under that legal jurisdiction. Personally, I do not believe that I can judge the quality of any company based solely on its location, but it is still an important consideration. I encourage everyone to make their own decisions in this regard, and use the service they feel comfortable with.
Still making up your mind about getting Ivacy VPN app for your iPhone? You really don't need to be skeptical because Ivacy for PC has a 30-day money-back guarantee*. So, if you are not pleased with the VPN app or its myriad features, you can always ask for a refund within the first 30-days of subscription! We believe in 100% customer satisfaction and we strive for nothing less!

We often receive emails asking about the interplay between VPNs and BitTorrent. Some of them have included admissions of piracy, and even justifications for it. One reader bemoaned the difficulty in finding legal avenues for material that is out of print or just hard to obtain or not available for sale in a given locale. We sympathize. The state of the public domain has been woefully neglected, and market forces and regional distribution deals often keep worthy art and materials out of the hands of those who want it, even if they are willing to pay for it. But no matter how just the reasoning, the law (however problematic) is the law. ISPs and, yes, other web companies, are often compelled to answer when rights holders come with a list of offenses carried out on their data infrastructure.


First, it prevents your ISP and anyone else on your local and ISP network from seeing that you are torrenting. Because all of the files you download and upload via BitTorrent are encrypted when they pass through your ISP’s servers, their contents cannot be identified. It would take a monumental time- and resource-consuming effort for an ISP to even attempt to crack the encryption put in place by your VPN service.
The practical upshot is that no one can intercept your web traffic as it moves from your computer to the VPN server. And if you're connecting to websites via HTTPS (which you should), your data remains encrypted for its entire journey, even after it leaves the VPN server. This is why you need a VPN. VPNs are particularly important when you're using public Wi-Fi or unfamiliar networks. In these situations, hackers may be lurking on the network or even running the network themselves, hoping to snag your personal information.
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