We believe in total honesty and integrity and this is the primary reasons that we prefer truthfulness over sensationalism. A guide that says the Free VPNs will work with Netflix, will definitely get more clicks than us, but they will seriously undermine their own website’s credibility. We don’t do that here, so if you liked our guide, then do mention it in the comments below!
Romania-based CyberGhost allows P2P filesharing on any server that isn’t located in the US or Russia. Due to legal pressure, CyberGhost actively blocks BitTorrent traffic in those two countries (presumably by blocking popular ports used by BitTorrent clients, but we haven’t tested this). CyberGhost isn’t wholly adverse to torrenting, though, and even has a “Torrent Anonymously” profile that will connect you to the best torrenting VPN server available.
Journalists and activists operating in regimes that censor the internet have used VPNs for years to securely tunnel past those web controls and access the open internet. By the same token, you can connect to a distant VPN server and make it appear as if your traffic is coming from a different country. That's handy, especially if you want to stream video from a different country.

Still making up your mind about getting Ivacy VPN app for your iPhone? You really don't need to be skeptical because Ivacy for PC has a 30-day money-back guarantee*. So, if you are not pleased with the VPN app or its myriad features, you can always ask for a refund within the first 30-days of subscription! We believe in 100% customer satisfaction and we strive for nothing less!
The VPN services listed should allow you to unblock US Netflix in any country you might be traveling to, other than those where media is censored and VPNs are actively blocked by a firewall such as China (see our list of the VPNs working in China and pick one that works there, too). In pretty much every other country, the VPNs in our list will work. In fact, we’ve received comments or emails from people in Canada, the UK, Germany, Australia, New Zealand, Switzerland, Finland, Norway, Sweden, the Netherlands, Denmark, Belgium, France, Israel, Spain, Ireland, South Africa, and Italy telling us they’ve successfully accessed US Netflix!
One of the major reasons why people recommend VPN over proxies is that torrent clients reveal your true location and leak information while using proxy. Although, the latest version of torrent clients are designed to do a better job at this but I personally don’t trust proxy services. They can be unreliable and fail to protect you while using torrents. I would rather stick with a VPN just because of this. Currently, I am using PIA (Private Internet Access) but I have also heard good reviews about PureVPN.
Buffered previously was able to unblock Netflix in a web browser on MacOS and Windows, but this is no longer the case as of September 2017. A customer support rep told us, “As of the moment, we are unable to access Netflix US with any of our servers. A fix is being worked on and should be forthcoming fairly shortly. We have no update though as of yet.”

Ivacy's streak of mediocrity continued into the upload tests, where it had the third-worst score recorded. Here, it reduced upload speed test results by 31.9 percent. To be fair, the worst score is far worse than that (KeepSolid VPN Unlimited, 71.3 percent), but it's also a long way from the best score. That goes to IPVanish, which slowed upload speed test results by only 2.9 percent. Again, Ivacy's international tests were a mirror of its domestic performance. Here, Ivacy had one of the better scores, reducing upload speed test results by 97.81 percent. It wasn't however, enough to unseat Private Internet Access, which reduced upload speed test results by 97.3 percent.
Torrent speeds heavily rely on the number of seeds, the higher the number of seeds a torrent file has the faster it is going to download. Since seeding refers to the number of people sharing the file for other torrenters. If a torrent file has a low ratio of seeders then your downloading speed is definitely going to suffer regardless of how fast your internet connection is.
Users who want access to the Belgian version of Netflix have the smallest choice of VPN providers; it can only be unblocked by one of the 59 VPNs we tested (ProtonVPN). Unblocking Netflix in countries like Belgium and Turkey is probably not at the top of the priority list for most VPNs, and many of the VPNs we tested don’t have servers in those countries at all.

Online piracy laws are a little fuzzy in India. A slew of news reports from 2016 suggested that even viewing certain web pages or torrent files (not the copyrighted content itself) was enough to penalize netizens with heavy fines and jail time. This is not true, however; the rumor arose from a poorly-worded warning from Indian ISPs that appeared when users tried to access blocked sites.


VPNs work by routing your web traffic through an encrypted tunnel between your computer and a server operated by the VPN company. Anyone snooping on your activities, even if they are the ones running the network, won't be able to see what you're up to. Even the ISPs will be blind. Advertisers and others on the web will have a harder time tracking your movements because your true IP address is hidden behind that of the VPN server and your traffic is mixed in with everyone else on that server.
Many VPN companies now offer browser extensions in addition to native apps. These are much more lightweight than their desktop companions and have the added advantage of being available anywhere you log in to a browser. The downside, as I discovered when working with Chromebook VPNs, is that VPN browser extensions only encrypt your browser traffic. The rest of your computer's data travels outside the encrypted tunnel.
Understanding what kind of information a VPN service collects, and how long it is maintained, can be hard to figure out. To get the answer, you may have to wade through unending FAQ pages and opaque terms of service written in arcane legalese. If the VPN company you're considering can't clearly explain what information it gathers and how long it will be kept, it's probably not a great service.
When comparing VPN companies, it's useful to look at how many servers the company offers and where those servers are located. In general, the closer the server is to you, the better performance you'll experience. So having a lot of servers in lots of different places means that you're more likely to have a better experience, no matter where you might roam.

In its policy, Ivacy says that it does not "log or monitor, online browsing activities, connection logs, VPN IPs assigned, original IP addresses, browsing history, outgoing traffic, connection times, data you have accessed and/or DNS queries generated by your end. We have no information that could associate specific activities to specific users." That's exactly what you want to hear from a VPN company.
Hotspot Shield is really popular – especially the free version. One of the main reasons for that is its super fast speeds, which are ideal for downloading. That said, the free version limits the amount of data you can use to 500 MB a day, which may not be enough depending on how big your torrent files are. But since it’s free, it’s worth giving a shot.
I have used Ivacy for almost two years and just a couple of failures with their KILL SWITCH. The downloading of my data stopped….very nice. Unfortunately the uploading did not! This has happened numerous times and the last time I got the letter from Hollywood via my Internet provider. Something about a copyright infringement. This is the second one while using the Ivacy program. Various servers in numerous countries, yet I am getting the same IP address assigned to me when I hook up.
×